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FAQ

In order to provide the best quality output possible we have attempted to answer your frequently asked questions. If you have additional questions please feel free to contact us.

Q?

What is Perforate?

A.

It is the creation of holes either by die or a bindery rolling process, for tear outs or coupons.

Q?

What are the different Fold Types?

A.

The type of fold used to complete your print job. A Letter Fold is a paper folded in thirds. A "Z" Fold differs in that the parts do not overlap but form a Z at the end. A Parallel Fold is a half fold; Double Parallel folds in half and then half again vs. a right angle where the second fold is done on a 90 degree angle from the first. Accordian Fold is just more panels than the Z and similar. A Gate Fold is where the two end panels meet in the center panel being the width equal to both end panels and a double gate folds in half towards the center after the initial gate fold.

Q?

What is a Die, Score and Cut?

A.

A "steel rule" die is manufactured, which is composed of thin pieces of steel that will be used to stamp a line or rule on the printed material. To die cut is to cut the printed piece almost like a cookie cutter. An example of this is a “presentation folder”.

Q?

Why is Microsoft Word not suitable for offset printing?

A.

Microsoft Word is not a desktop publishing program. It creates and displays colour only in RGB. RGB colour formats do not colour separate for offset printing.

Q?

What is a “bleed”?

A.

A "bleed" is when the ink prints to the very edge of the paper. When using "bleeds" you must allow for the art to extend 1/8" beyond the page border.

Q?

Can I use pictures from my digital camera?

A.

The digital camera takes pictures as RGB. Save the images onto the picture (memory) card at the highest quality possible. Remember images should be at 300 dpi and converted to CMYK in their final size in the layout.

Q?

Will you match a colour sample from my own printer?

A.

There is no guarantee your finished piece will be exactly like your printed sample. This is due in part to the widely varying results from the different output devices including inkjet and laser printers, continuous tone proofing devices, high-resolution film-based proofs and different than true offset lithography. In particular, inkjet and laser prints are known to look substantially different than true offset.

Q?

What is camera ready art?

A.

Camera ready art is referred to files that are ready to print.

Q?

What is the Pantone Matching System?

A.

The Pantone Matching System also known as PMS colour system is a popular colour matching system used by the printing industry to print specific colours. PMS match book is a book of colour where each PMS colour has its own name or number that helps you make sure your colours are the same each time you print, even if your computer monitor displays a different colour or if you change printing services.

Q?

File Format

A.

All files should be converted to a PDF with embedded fonts and crop marks. Most programs including MS Word and MS Publisher allow files to be "saved as" a PDF. Customers can send us files via CD, DVD, flash drive, or email.

Q?

Printing with Bleeds

A.

Documents designed to have colour or an image right to the edge of the paper will need a “bleed”. Designs with a bleed usually require crop (cut) marks and the image must extend 1/8 inch past the trim size.

Q?

Image Quality

A.

Images should be saved at 300 dpi* minimum so that they print as sharply as possible. Saving a poor quality (72 dpi) image as a high quality (300 dpi) image will not make it look or print better. All photographs need to be converted to CMYK. Images that are saved as web site images are only one-third of the recommended quality for printing.

* DPI stands for dots per square inch. The measurement of resolution for printer at 300 dpi to 72 dpi on monitors.

Q?

Why is the colour of the finished print different from my laser print?

A.

Every computer monitor and/or printer will interpret the colour in your document differently.  We calibrate our copiers often to make sure it prints as accurately as possible but there is no guarantee it will match the colour on your monitor or personal laser printer.

Q?

What is the difference between “spot colours” and “four colour process”?

A.

A spot colour is colour that can be assigned a PMS (Pantone Matching System) number. Example: Reflex Blue is one spot colour and not a mixture of colours. Four colour process is a combination of CMYK: C (cyan), M (magenta), Y (yellow) and K (black) to produce a variation of colours.

Q?

What is the difference between RGB and CMYK?

A.

RGB refers to the primary colours of light, Red, Green and Blue that are used on your monitor. CMYK refers to the primary colours of pigment: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black. Many programs have the capability to convert the layout/images from the RGB to the CMYK.

Q?

What is the difference between coated and uncoated stock?

A.

Uncoated stock is a rough porous type of paper. It is normally used for letterhead, envelopes, invitations, etc. Coated stock has a smooth glossy finish. Printing on this type of paper will sharpen your layouts, especially photographs. Coated stock, usually needs a varnish to protect the finish.